Round The Universe



Did I step down from a spaceship
that was orbiting your earth ?
Shining like a star above
you way down in the dirt
Won't you take me to your leader,
Won't you show me round the sights ?
I don't think I've landed here before
but then again I might

Because your face looks so familiar
But your eyes have lost their shine

I can take you round the universe
in a hot wired police car
We can ram-raid Mars and Jupiter
And drive right through a star
There's one thing you can do for me
hear me now my friend
Tell me, tell me, tell me why,
all good things must come to an end ?

Did I crash land in your conscience ?
Did I rain on your parade ?
Am I your alien abduction nightmare ?
Won't you be my slave ?

Is there anybody in there ?
Hey there earthling get the phone
Your virtual reality's a house it's not a home

Well a truth as strange as fiction is
right there in your eyes

I can take you round the universe
in a hot wired police car
We can ram-raid Mars and Jupiter
And drive right through a star
There's one thing you can do for me
hear me now my friend
Tell me, tell me, tell me why,
all good things must come to an end ?


Lyrics by:
Squire

Available on:
Do It Yourself (3.45)

Details:
The intro of Round The Universe mimics 'Helter Skelter', by The Beatles.

Helter Skelter is from The Beatles' White Album, from which Brown has also taken inspiration (see My Star).

The lyric, "Because your face looks so familiar, but your eyes have lost their shine" is close to a comment Squire would make about Brown several years later in a Guardian newspaper interview with Dave Simpson (6th September 2002):

The verses are overloaded with sarcastic retorts to Brown's protestations about 'not knowing where the kid (Squire) was coming from': "Did I step down from a spaceship" ... "Am I your alien abduction nightmare ? Won't you be my slave ?". Brown often gives the impression that his hands were tied in the Second Coming era, that he had little choice but to let Squire dictate affairs. The singer also points to Squire's excessiveness in the Second Coming years as the catalyst for the group's downfall; "My only excess was guitar solos" was Squire's response to this charge, speaking to The Guardian in September 2002. Brown's lethargy in this period was, in truth, a much more debilitating factor. Had Squire not taken the initiative, the Roses' hiatus would have reached Stereo MCs proportions.


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