3 Wide



"Hello. Is this the room ? Is this, is this, is this the room ?
Uh, I suggest, that uh, yes it is. Are you the one that, uh ? Are you the one that, uh ? Are you the one that, uh ?"

Starlight (starlight)
White lines (white lines)
I'm yours, you're mine

Three lines (three lines, three lines)
I'm yours (I'm yours)
You're mine

Starlight (starlight)
White lines (white lines)
I'm yours, you're mine

Starlight (starlight)
White lines (white lines)
I'm yours, you're mine

Three lines, outside
(three lines, outside)
I'm yours, you're mine
(I'm yours, you're mine)


Lyrics by:
Squire

Available on:
You Can Talk To Me single (b-side) (5.08)

Details:
Billed as "The Seahorses as you've never heard them before", 3 Wide is a strong b-side, with a razor-sharp guitar lick.

The following extract is from a March 2001 issue of Q magazine ('The 100 best album covers ever'; the Roses' debut is placed at Number 5), in which Squire describes his post-Second Coming artwork. The 3-metre-wide butterfly, 'Léger City Butterfly', an homage to Fernand Léger (1881 - 1955), one would imagine, relates to the song 3 Wide:

 

Top left: Squire carefully positioned in front of the antennae of 'Léger City Butterfly'.
Top right: 'Léger City Butterfly' (oil and acrylic on canvas, 90" x 120", 2001), from the Manchester exhibition, May 2004.
Bottom: 'La Ville' ('The City') (1919) by Fernand Léger. Squire's artistic work focuses on the left hand side of Léger's 'La Ville', using the disc shapes to create butterfly markings via symmetry. In 'La Ville', overlapping and layered planes depict urban density, and fragments show the speed of urban experience. The broken views of billboard texts and images indicate not only the multiple stimuli available in the city but, even more, the speech with which residents traverse urban space. Léger was a French painter, sculptor and filmmaker. In his early works, he created a personal form of Cubism which he gradually modified into a more figurative, populist style. As one of the first painters to take as his idiom the imagery of the machine age, and to make the objects of consumer society the subjects of his paintings, Léger has been called a progenitor of Pop Art.


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