This Is The One



A girl consumed by fire
We all know her desire
From the plans that she has made
I have her on a promise
Immerse me in your splendour
All the plans that I have made

This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
She's waited for

This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
Oh this is the one
This is the one
She's waited for

I'd like to leave the country
For a month of Sundays
Burn the town where I was born
If only she'd believe me
Bellona Belladonna
Burn me out or bring me home

And this is the one
This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
She's waited for

This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
Oh this is the one
This is the one
I've waited for

Oh this is the one
Oh this is the one
This is the one
I've waited for

This is the one
Oh this is the one
Oh this is the one
This is the one
I've waited for

This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
Oh this is the one
This is the one
I've waited for

I've made a plan
But it might go wrong
This is the one
This is the one
She's waited for

And this is the one
This is the one
This is the one
This is the one
She's waited for

And this is the one
Oh this is the one
Ah this is the one
This is the one
I've waited for


Lyrics by:
Brown

Music by:
Squire / Brown

Written:
1985

Personnel:
John Squire (guitar)
Ian Brown (vocals)
Gary Mounfield (bass)
Alan Wren (drums, backing vocals)

Producer:
John Leckie

Engineer:
Paul Schroeder

Available on:
The Stone Roses (4.58)
Garage Flower (3.42)
The Stone Roses (10th Anniversary Edition) (4.59)
The Very Best Of The Stone Roses (5.02)

First live performance:
In 1985.

Details:
The Stone Roses were put on the spot by producer Martin Hannett to write a new song, and This Is The One was the result of that curfew. Hannett's frenzied 1985 Garage Flower offering would be distilled of its punk grit four years later by John Leckie's assured production. Of all the debut album tracks, Leckie found this the most challenging:

The song's title, which is looped at the end in a swirling climax, is taken from the prophecy of John the Baptist, in 'Jesus the Lamb of God'. The ministry of John the Baptist lights the way for Israel to see and accept its Messiah. What The World Is Waiting For.

"This is the one I've waited for...". 'The Baptism' (1442) by Piero della Francesca (c. 1415 - 1492).

Jesus was the one that Mary had waited for ("This is the one she's waited for"). The verses, I propose, alternate between the birth of Jesus and Lucifer's expulsion from Heaven. For example, the lyric "I have her on a promise" pertains to Mary being espoused to Joseph; Joseph had Mary 'on a promise' of marriage.

"I had her on a promise...". The Wedding of the Virgin by Raphael (1483 – 1520)

We are then transported to 'A Prophecy Against the King of Tyre' (Ezekiel 28: 1 - 19):

 

'The fall of Lucifer' (left) and 'Lucifer' (right), Gustave Dorι (1832 - 1883) illustrations for 'Paradise Lost' by John Milton.

Both Mary and Joseph were visited by the Archangel Gabriel and told that they would be the parents of the Son of God. "With only but a donkey" (see the demo verse below) refers to when they fled Bethlehem with the baby Jesus to go to Egypt, when they had only a donkey to bring them there. The bible does not state that the journey was by donkey, but it was either via donkey or foot; The Nativity Story incorporates a donkey. This was a trip of about two hundred miles by foot or donkey, over mountains, wilderness, and desert that would have taken at least ten days to complete. God sent His angel to command them to undertake such a gruelling trip because Herod's power did not reach to Egypt, and thus the child Christ would be safe there. Furthermore, historically, Egypt had been the land of refuge for those fleeing from Palestine; for example, Jacob and his family, Jeroboam, and the prophets Uriah and Jeremiah at various times all sought refuge there. The original lyrics to the second verse of the This Is The One demo, from 'The First Coming' CD, are as follows:

And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be taxed. The Decree by Art Garfunkel may have been an inspirational spark here (From Galilee to Bethlehem / She journeyed with only a donkey to ride...).

Then Gabriel came and said to Joseph alone / "Do not be afraid to make Mary your own / But go to your betrothed and then be married / The child is Heaven sent"...
Top: 'Annunciation' (1472 - 1475) by Leonardo da Vinci (1452 – 1519).
Middle: "With only but a donkey...". 'The Census in Bethlehem' (1566) by Pieter Bruegel the Elder (c.1525 – 1569). Bruegel's painting of The Census in Bethlehem is filled with men, women, children and animals. Although entitled 'The Census in Bethlehem, Bruegel sets it in a busy Flemish village in winter, bringing home the story for himself and his audience. Bruegel's art unifies this random bustle. No obvious focal points direct us as we look at the painting, because Bruegel wants us to enter into the village and orient ourselves as visitors would have done. When we get our bearings we notice that a crowd of people is collecting in front of the building in the foreground left. Just inside, some men sit at a table examining documents and making notes in a ledger. The villagers crowd around, waiting their turn. Surveying the work from left to right, one notices two large wooden O's made by the wheels of some hay wagons. The circle has been universally accepted as the symbol of eternity and everlasting existence; as the monogram for God, it stands for both the perfection and the eternity of God. Then we notice a young woman on a horse led by a man on foot. The woman is almost hidden by her heavy winter clothing. But we realize this is Mary, and suddenly we are aware of how mundane events can be transformed into miracle.
Bottom: 'The Flight into Egypt' (1600 - 03) by Bartolomeo Carducci (1560 – 1608).

The song makes several references to a 'plan' which might go wrong. Would Mary and Joseph accept the abrupt news from the angel of the Lord that Mary would give birth to the Son of Man ? The law in the first century stated that a betrothed women who became pregnant as an adulteress was subject to death by stoning. The lyric, "I'd like to leave the country for a month of Sundays" refers to Joseph leaving Nazareth, Galilee, to go to Bethlehem, Judea. This was prompted by Caesar Augustus, the first Roman Emperor, issuing a decree calling for a census to be taken of the entire Roman world, with everyone having to go to their own town to register.

Joseph and Mary left the country for the final month of Mary's pregnancy, known in the Christian calendar as Advent: a period of time beginning with the fourth Sunday before Christmas and ending with Christmas Eve. Hence, they left the country for 'a month of Sundays'. The previously mentioned 'plan' came perilously close to going wrong when Herod ordered the Massacre of the Innocents, an episode of mass infanticide by the King of Judea, Herod the Great, that appears in the Gospel of Matthew 2: 16 - 18. King Herod ordered the execution of all young male children in the village of Bethlehem, so as to avoid the loss of his throne to a newborn King of the Jews, whose birth had been announced to him by the Magi. "Burn the town where I was born" (a phrase beautifully relayed by Reni on backing vocals, on the '20th Anniversary' demo version) refers to this Massacre of the Innocents; after Herod was unsuccessful in his effort to fool the Magi into leading him to Jesus so that he could kill Him, he became furious and ordered a massacre of Bethlehem, the birthplace of Jesus Christ. Herod was unsuccessful in his attempt to kill Jesus and, after hearing news of Herod's death, Jesus, Mary and Joseph returned 'home' to Nazareth, hence 'Burn me out or bring me home':

'The Massacre of the Innocents' (1629) by Nicholas Poussin (1594 - 1665), painted at the height of the Thirty Years War.

Bellona was an Ancient Roman war goddess, who represented the frenzy of battle and was variously identified as the wife, sister, or daughter of Mars. All Senate meetings relating to foreign war were conducted in the Templum Bellonae (Temple of Bellona) on the Collis Capitolinus, outside the pomerium. The name 'Bellona' derived from the Latin word for 'war' (bellum), and is directly related to the modern English word, 'belligerent' (lit., 'war-waging'). Near the beginning of Shakespeare's Macbeth (I.ii.54), Macbeth is introduced as a violent and brave warrior when the Thane of Ross calls him "Bellona's bridegroom" (i.e., Mars). In art, she is portrayed with a helmet, sword, spear, and torch; the goddess has proved popular in post-Renaissance art as a female embodiment of military virtue. The name Bellona, the goddess of War, is present within the letters Belladonna; accordingly, Ian names first the goddess, then the plant. Bellona's priests used belladonna in religious ritual. For further evidence of this lyrical technique of 'encoding' within words, see Goodbye To The Broken.

 

 

Top left: Atropa belladonna or 'deadly nightshade', a perennial herbaceous plant. The foliage and berries are extremely toxic, containing tropane alkaloids. These toxins include scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which cause a bizarre delirium and hallucinations. The drug atropine is derived from the plant. The genus name 'atropa' comes from Atropos, one of the three Fates in Greek mythology, and the name 'atropa bella donna' is derived from an admonition in Italian and Greek, meaning 'do not betray a beautiful lady'. In West European magick, this crone herb has been used for astral projection and is apparently an ingredient in flying ointments; even now, it is considered a witchcraft essential.
Top right: Amaryllis belladonna or Belladonna Lily or 'naked ladies', a monotypic genus of plant. Amaryllis belladonna has religious connotations with the Virgin Mary, a central figure of this song.
Bottom left: 'The Garden of Eden' (c. 1410) by an unknown German Master, in which the serpentine intertwinement of the two trunks of the trees on the left serves as a memory of Man's Fall. One of the many flowers associated with 'Mary's garden' is the aforementioed 'Amaryllis belladonna'. Another is the 'Madonna Lily', symbolic of Mary's purity, the flower presented to Mary by the Archangel Gabriel at the Annunciation (see 'Annunciation' above, by Leonardo da Vinci). The beauty of the lily is commented upon by Christ Himself (Luke 12: 27). This garden is a harmonious scene of beauty, where angels play. The crowns are golden garlands of flowers, St Cecilia's grasp of the psaltery forms a mirrored symmetry to the instrument itself, and the parallel lines of grasses appear to be growing from the strings of the psaltery. Pre-Reformation paintings of Mary and Jesus often place them in an enclosed garden (hortus conclusus) with St Anne and other female saints. They are a reminder that, while Christ's divinity came from God, His humanity came from female flesh.
Bottom right: 'Marie de Medici as Bellona' (1622 - 25) by Peter Paul Rubens (1577 – 1640).

At home fixtures, Manchester United walk on to the Old Trafford pitch to This Is The One. For Gary Neville's testimonial in May 2011, Ian Brown sang the song a cappella for the player's entrance on to the pitch. Stone Roses lyrics are a feature of banners among the United supporters. Next to a 'One United - One Love' (referencing The Stone Roses song, One Love) banner at Old Trafford is another with the lyric, 'Sent to me from Heaven, you are my world' (from Sally Cinnamon) with pictures of George Best, Denis Law, Bobby Charlton and Duncan Edwards.

Ian Brown requested that his NME 'Godlike Genius' award in 2006 was presented to him by one of the club's treble winning side of 1999, Teddy Sheringham. Ian Brown's solo work continues to inspire banners, with 'MUFC: For EveryManc A Religion' (based on the acronym, F.E.A.R.). Stone Roses lyrics also feature on banners of FC United of Manchester, founded in 2005. One would imagine that Ian Brown and Mick Hucknall would not have been particularly approving of the career path chosen by Sylvan Richardson (who shares the exact same birthdate as Ian Brown - 20th February 1963) in July 2010. The former Simply Red guitarist, who was mooted to be replacing John Squire in The Stone Roses in 1996 (and was later Ian's bass player) became a masseur at Liverpool FC in 2010 !

Eric Cantona appears in the 2013 Shane Meadows documentary, Made of Stone. Both This Is The One and Waterfall feature in the 2013 Manchester United documentary, The Class of '92 (which includes an interview with Mani).

 

 

Top left: The F.E.A.R.-inspired 'MUFC: For EveryManc A Religion' banner.
Top right: Man United banner inspired by both One Love and Sally Cinnamon. Another Stone Roses-inspired banner at Old Trafford simply has the word ADORED, with the letters RED highlighted in red. When John and Reni were informed of the band's victory in the Silvertone court case on 15th May 1991, there was double cause for celebration for John, as he was with Reni in Rotterdam to see Manchester United defeat Barcelona 2-1 in the European Cup Winners' Cup final. On the 2012 Stone Roses reunion tour, Mani had MANI UTD emblazoned on the back of his bass guitar. The two bass designs seen here were personally designed for Mani by artist Jim Lambie. The second row shows detail of Lambie's installation at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., which illustrates his typical use of coloured tape.
Third row (left): FC United of Manchester banner inspired by I Wanna Be Adored. This alludes to Manchester United having 'sold their soul' to the Glazer family. After Manchester United F.C. was floated on the stock market in 1990, the high value of the club made it seem unlikely that a hostile takeover would be possible. Nevertheless, in June 2005, Malcolm Glazer succeeded not only in gaining control of the club through his takeover vehicle, Red Football Ltd., but converting it into a completely private company. Between 2003 and 2005, Glazer gradually bought out the shareholders in Manchester United in a deal that valued the club at around $1.47 billion. The takeover was fiercely opposed by many fans of the club, who organised themselves in the form of the independent 'Manchester United Supporters' Trust' (formerly 'Shareholders United'), partly because the Glazer takeover saddled the club with a large debt (over $850m) and interest that comes with it (approximately £60 million per year) but also because of many fans' belief that the club should be in the hands of fans and not businessmen. The escalation in ticket prices took place at a time when the club received more money than ever from TV and sponsorship deals. Since 2005, the ticket prices at Old Trafford have increased significantly, confirming MUST's fears that the fans' support would be the source of the finance to service the huge debt. In anger at the takeover, thousands of fans refused to renew their season tickets, instead coming together to set up a new club called F.C. United of Manchester.
Third row (right): FC United of Manchester banner inspired by The Stone Roses' I Am The Resurrection. FC United of Manchester considers itself to be the 'Resurrection' of a 'dead' club.
Penultimate row: In August 1986, five fans were stabbed on a cross-channel ferry to France after violence broke out between fans of West Ham and Manchester United. Mani was onboard the ferry, and was subsequently interviewed with friends on the news. The brawl, involving nearly 150 fans, broke out on the Dutch ferry Koningin Beatrix, when supporters of the two teams began trading insults in one of the ferry's crowded duty-free bars. The fans were journeying to the Netherlands to watch their teams in pre-season friendly matches, which did not fall under the European ban on English teams following Heysel. Sporadic fighting broke out and soon escalated, with some of the fans wielding knives and breaking bottles for use as sharp weapons. Others threw chairs and swung fire extinguishers at each other. About 2,000 terrified vacationers aboard the ferry locked themselves in their cabins. The Koningin Beatrix left Harwich for Hook of Holland at 10:30pm on Thursday 7th August, but when fighting intensified, the captain ordered his crew to lock the rioters in the bar, and turned the ship around at about 1am on Friday.
Bottom row: One of John Squire's Celebrity artworks from 2011 is entitled 'David Beckham' (ink & oil on canvas, 90cm x 70cm). Squire explained the process of selecting names to the Daily Record in June 2011: "It's been difficult choosing the names to paint. I've tried not to make it a list of people I admire or people I despise. I have tried to make it as little about me as possible. I looked at lists of the top 100 celebrities and celebrity websites and I looked at magazines lying around the house. I tried to incorporate the obvious and throw a few curve balls in there. With the David Beckham one, I had seen an image of him in quite a restrained and muted outfit. There was a lot of brown and tan in there. Midway through the piece suggested that photograph and it seemed a good fit." The eight-pointed stars in this work can take the visual form of a head or football, giving the impression of a formation of footballers. One of the "curve balls" thrown by Squire, I suggest, would be 'Arnold Schwarzenegger' (ink & oil on canvas, 90cm x 70cm). The top half of this work takes the form of a weightlifter lifting a barbell overhead, which could be related to Schwarzenegger's early bodybuilding career.

In 2006, Reni wrote a poem entitled 'Enter The Arena', which captures his experience of being a ball boy at Maine Road. It was first displayed as part of a Manchester music exhibition held at the old club museum in 2006:

Modal analysis (by Steve Davidson):

This song is in E Ionian mode all the way through. The chords are E major, B major and A major. Here are the notes:

E F# G# A B C# D# E


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