Trust A Fox



Dirty linen's on public display
This fox is a vulture, make no mistake
The day is long gone when I succumb to this
End of my day, nothin' but rage

He'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
He'll cut your face as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face
As soon as say, as soon as say, as soon as say
Hello

Dirty linen's on public display
No I need no excuse, up and away
Trust me, trust a fox, a silly thing to do
I want the blood of an Englishman

He'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face as soon as say hello
He'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face
As soon as say, as soon as say, as soon as say
Hello

Ha !

I'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face
As soon as say, as soon as say, as soon as say
Hello

As soon as say hello, as soon as say hello
As soon as say hello, as soon as say hello

He'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
He'll cut your face as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face up as soon as say hello
I'll cut your face
As soon as say, as soon as say, as soon as say
Hello


Lyrics by:
Brown

Music by:
Squire / Brown

Written:
1984

Personnel:
John Squire (lead guitar)
Ian Brown (vocals)
Andy Couzens (rhythm guitar)
Pete Garner (bass)
Alan Wren (drums)

Produced by:
Martin Hannett

Available on:
Garage Flower (3.00)

First live performance:
In 1985.

Pseudonyms:
'Hello', 'How Long'

Details:

'The Beheading of Saint John the Baptist' (1608) by Caravaggio.

Trust A Fox has thematic parallel with How Do You Sleep. Jesus called Herod a fox; this, coupled with the repeated "cut your face up" lyric suggests the beheading of John the Baptist. Herod married his half-brother's wife, Herodias, and had John the Baptist imprisoned and finally beheaded for his condemnation of the marriage. Meanwhile, Jesus' reputation was growing - He drove out a demon, healed a bleeding woman and raised up a dead girl in Luke, Chapter 8.

The Pharisees warn Jesus of Herod's threat:

The use of the word 'fox' should not be taken in the modern sense of the word (sly, cunning); rather, Jesus was commenting upon Herod's ineptitude, or inability to carry out his threat. Jesus longed to gather Jerusalem as a mother hen gathers her chicks under her wings. There is a phrase, 'Don't let the fox guard the henhouse', meaning not to assign a job to someone who will then be in a position to exploit it for his or her own ends. You canít trust a fox - he'll find a way to do you in - and Herod Antipas was such a creature. We also know that Jewish rabbis routinely referred to people who were worthless and insignificant as a 'fox'. Herod Antipas was a tetrarch, which was a subordinate or dependent prince. When his father, Herod the Great died, his kingdom was divided into four parts and the Roman emperor named Herod Antipas the tetrarch over the region of Galilee, Jesus' home. Herod was in effect a puppet prince, a pompous pretender who was merely doing the bidding of the Roman emperor. Herod might see himself as a lion, an imperial potentate, but in reality, he was just a fox.

Instead of the fox guarding the hen house, that week in Jerusalem, the hen willingly entered the fox's lair.


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