Tables For Ladies



Left them all behind
On a cold winter morning
Never took the time to say
Goodbye

Said she'd lost her voice
Somewhere deep down inside
A place she still likes
To hide

And if we ever get out of here alive
I work for you babe
We're in the wrong trade
After the ice age
We'll still be laying these
Tables for ladies

Came out of the sun
My perfect stranger
You can't imagine how hard it gets

And time flies by
Like a petulant glacier
With a stone in its shoe

If we ever get out of here alive
I work for you babe
We're in the wrong trade
After the ice age
We'll still be laying these
Tables for ladies


Lyrics by:
Squire

Available on:
Marshall's House (2.45)

Details:

Tables For Ladies (1930) by Edward Hopper.

In this painting, the viewer is outside (perhaps hungry, as the Great Depression took hold of America) a finely displayed restaurant in 1930. In restaurants, Hopper saw reflected the changing face of the American woman. Victorian-era rules of feminine behaviour were being discarded everywhere, especially in casual eateries. For a proper woman, 'dining out' traditionally meant eating in the company of a suitable escort, lest the lady be mistaken for a prostitute; typically only male businessmen or travellers dined in restaurants. When the discreet but welcoming sign 'Tables for Ladies' appeared in the window, it signalled a restaurant's acceptance that society was changing. Hopper found some of his first New York subjects in restaurants. Cafes were convenient places for Hopper to sit and watch people, honing his skills as an observer and recorder of character types. As a magazine illustrator - Hopper made his living principally in commercial art from 1906 to 1925 - he had become adept at creating richly descriptive images that suggest story lines and character situations.

Thanksgiving maskers outside a restaurant circa 1911, when a roast turkey dinner with all the fixings was 40 cents. Note the sign, 'Tables reserved for ladies', in the window.


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