Time Changes Everything



Such a low down dirty trick you played me
You work your witchcraft so well
Straight through my bleeding heart
Another martyr to your hypodermic kiss
Your needle don't ever seem to miss

Time changes everything
Why did we have to say goodbye ?
And I know why the caged bird sings
Time changes everything

Was that a face I saw at the window ?
Did I hear footsteps out in the hall ?
All the people that we used to know
Faces stranded in my mind
Faces drawn without lines

Time changes everything
Why did we have to say goodbye ?
I know why the caged bird sings
Time changes everything

How can the world ?
Keep on turning ?
What else is it gonna do ?
I'm still growing, I'm still growing
I am now, I'm not the only child
Hanging in the frame with you

Time changes everything
Why did we have to say goodbye ?
I know why the caged bird sings
Time changes everything


Lyrics by:
Squire

Format:
Released: February 2003
Time Changes Everything (5 Force PR, 1 Track Promo CD)
Time Changes Everything (Red Alert PR, 1 Track Promo CD)

Also available on:
Time Changes Everything (4.45)

Details:
With hammond organ, mellotron, and Fender Rhodes featuring throughout, John Squire's debut LP has a warm, organic, early '70s folk rock sound. Lyrically, Squire plays the eloquent bard, possessed by sageness and telling fragmentary and esoteric tales containing various allusions to The Stone Roses. The title track has the same choral melody as Ten Storey Love Song, and lines 3 - 5 in the opening verse here allude to the Ten Storey Love Song video. This video, I propose, was based around a Francis Bacon painting, 'Version Two of Lying Figure with Hypodermic Syringe' (1953); "...hanging in the frame with you" gives a further clue as to the song's artistic leanings. Squire and Mani extend childlike gestures of friendship to a regressive Ian in this video (see, for example, the scene where Mani brings a football to him). "Faces drawn without lines" relates to the unorthodox artistic techniques of Bacon, in his graphic depiction of such haunting faces. Several of Bacon's figures, such as that in 'Version Two of Lying Figure with Hypodermic Syringe', are trapped in cages, just like the bird in Maya Angelou's autobiographical 'I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings'. This 1969 work takes its title from the poem 'Sympathy' by Paul Laurence Dunbar, an African-American poet, novelist, and playwright of the late 19th and early 20th century:

'Salt of the Earth' by The Rolling Stones is a strong influence here, whilst the interaction between the piano and other instruments at the end is reminiscent of David Bowie's 'Time', from 'Aladdin Sane' (on which note, the guitar on 'What Are You Waiting For' by Reluctance reworks Bowie's 'The Width of a Circle').


Back To John Squire

Back To Time Changes Everything