I Miss You



I miss you
But I can't complain
Still got you running round my brain
Acres of green grass
Going up in flames
Still got you running round my brain

We walked in the fields by the reservoir
Capable of anything
Never far
from the wheels of industry
Turning us all around
Shaping you and me

I don't cry myself to sleep
I don't crawl the ocean floor
Like some ragged claw
Lost to the deep long ago oh no
But I miss you

I miss you
And I know deep down
That you
Miss me too

If I could switch to an alternate theme
Live a double life
Chase the dream
Under no illusion
Under no thumb
I'd turn the clock back in a second, son

Can't hold back the tears anymore
Throw some sandbags round the door
Maybe I can drown in my misery
Whatever happened to you and me ?

The bridge is out
And the phones are down
Heavy weather in the soul

Remember when we were heroes ?
When we were gold
Said I miss you

I miss you
And I know deep down that you
Miss me too

I'm a bad boy
I miss you honey
Yes I do

I'm a bad boy
I miss you honey
Yes I do

I'm a bad boy
I miss you honey
Yes I do

I'm a bad boy
I miss you honey
Yes I
Yes I
Yes I
Yes I do


Lyrics by:
Squire

Available on:
Time Changes Everything (3.51)

Details:
A song tinged with regret at the road not taken, by a man in search of lost time. Curiously, John Squire said in an interview that I Miss You was written not only towards Brown ("Acres of green grass going up in flames" refers to Brown's penchant for weed) but also to a former girlfriend. On The Gravy Train, Ian built on Dillinger's 'Cocaine In My Brain', and here one year later, Squire finds space there for Brown, with the amicable offering, "Still got you running round my brain." Such affability is not entirely without reservation, however, seeing as it is tagged to the aforementioned "Acres of green grass..." lyric. The third verse is influenced by the following extract of 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock' by T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965), which neatly ties in with the smoking habit of Brown:

Eliot's poem explores, through the introspections of the narrator, the emptiness and soulless quality of the bleak social world surrounding him. It is interesting to note that it opens with a passage from Dante's Inferno (Canto 27, lines 61 - 66), as the opening song on Time Changes Everything, Joe Louis, also has elements of this. John Squire may have become aware of the poem through one of his favourite films, Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now. Eliot's poetry governs the film's climax; When Willard (Martin Sheen) first encounters Dennis Hopper, a manic freelance photographer and devoted disciple of Kurtz, the photojournalist tries to convey his own worth in relation to that of Kurtz by effusively reciting the above Eliot extract:

Page 38 of The Stone Roses And The Resurrection of British Pop: The Reunion Edition by John Robb describes a focal point for Ian and John, between Sale and Altrincham. In the fields near where they lived was a river and small nondescript bridge; could this be the "fields by the reservoir" of I Miss You ?

'I Miss You', a photograph by John Squire which features in the debut LP collage.


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