Gas



Oh how the night shines
On your pale blue cotton collar
Hope your wife don't mind
These late night speeding callers

Bye bye baby
I never heard you call
Bye bye baby
I never heard you call

There used to be a boy who loved you
He held your oily hand
Do you think he knew your secret
Or was he too young to understand

Bye bye baby
I never heard you call
Bye bye baby
I came here to break your fall

Could you be looking for someone
The mold from which I was cast
Didn't stop for your council
Your food, water or gas

Bye bye baby
I never heard you call
Bye bye baby
I came here to end it all


Lyrics by:
Squire

Available on:
Marshall's House (3.55)

Details:

Gas (1940) by Edward Hopper. The brightly-lit station seems like a last welcoming oasis along a road to impenetrable darkness.

Hopper's Gas is a study of isolation in Truro, Massachusetts, portraying a petrol station standing on its own in the impending darkness. The darkness that spreads like a fog from the right of the canvas, a harbinger of fear, contrasts with the security of the building. A lone attendant adjusts a nozzle at this deserted rural filling station; the lanky figure (not unlike that of the artist) echoes the form of each pump, whose progression in the center of the canvas leads the viewer down the empty country road.


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