Gettin' High



I could have found you if I wanted
I wouldn't even have to try
Saved you if I longed it
But you didn't wanna see me cry

You were gettin' high
You were gettin' high

I could have found you if I wanted
I wouldn't even have to try
Saved you if I longed it
You didn't wanna see me cry

You were gettin' high
You were gettin' high

I could have found you if I wanted
I wouldn't even have to try
Saved you if I'd longed it
You didn't wanna see me cry

You were gettin' high
You were gettin' high

I could astound you if I wanted
Wouldn't even have to try
Saved you if I'd longed it
You didn't wanna see me cry

You were gettin' high
You were gettin' high


Lyrics by:
Brown / Ibrahim

Available on:
Golden Greats (4.01)

Details:

John Squire and Ian Brown in their post-Roses work have each attempted to recreate Led Zeppelin's 'Kashmir': Squire on Standing On Your Head (a song which originated from the Second Coming sessions), and Brown on Gettin' High. Brown's take is comfortably the better of the two. Aziz's frenetic playing is offset by an effortless vocal delivery from Ian, which sees the singer languidly drop the personal pronoun ("Wouldn't even have to try") on the song's final verse. If one were to map the trajectory of The Stone Roses and Oasis, the former were becoming a laughing stock, falling to their nadir in the very same fortnight that the latter reached the peak of their powers. Gettin' High is aimed at Squire's celebratory guest appearance with Oasis at Knebworth, in August 1996, two weeks prior to The Stone Roses' shambolic last stand at Reading. At the Reading Festival press conference, both Ian and Mani were heavily critical of Squire's Knebworth cameo. Oasis' back-to-back shows at Knebworth, on 10th & 11th August 1996, drew the largest crowds ever to see a single act in British music history, with a combined audience of over 250,000 (a feat only topped by Robbie Williams' three night slot there in 2003). Over 2.6 million people applied for tickets for the Oasis shows, making it also the biggest demand for concert tickets in British music history. Squire graced both nights, performing two songs with Oasis ('I Am The Walrus' and 'Champagne Supernova'), while Brown was left with egg on his face.

The inspirational cycle here is an interesting one to catalogue. Noel has strongly intimated that the above refrain is directed towards The Stone Roses. On this page, I propose that a lyric from Champagne Supernova has been formed around the opening verse of Going Down. The Ten Storey Love Song video by The Stone Roses serves as a template for Champagne Supernova. John Squire, having recently left The Stone Roses, guests on Champagne Supernova with Oasis at Knebworth. On his second solo LP, Ian Brown, sampling Murassi (by former Stone Roses guitarist Aziz Ibrahim), forms Gettin' High around the Champagne Supernova refrain. Brown's assertion is that Squire was getting high with Oasis, after deserting The Stone Roses. A lyrical flow is strongly evident, continuing on even into the solo career of John Squire:

"...Wipe that tear away now from your eye / Slowly walking down the hall..." (Champagne Supernova)

"...You didn't wanna see me cry / You were gettin' high..." (Gettin' High)

"...Too late to cry and walk in by..." (Shine A Little Light)

The messianic-tinged "Saved you..." lyric, communicated towards Squire, is most probably formed around the chorus of Wonderwall. A connection with Champagne Supernova ("Some day you will find me...") is also identifiable in the lyric, "I could have found you if I wanted".

   

 

Top left: Champagne Supernova by Oasis.
Top centre: The queue for the bar at Spike Island, 1990.
Top right: The organisers of the Spike Island festival should have concerned themselves less with confiscation of what people might bring, and more with what the event itself should be providing. Food and drink was confiscated from fans at the gates by management and bouncers, in an effort to boost sales of five-quid burgers once they got in. The two most common complaints by many who attended the festival can be related to this sign at the festival's entrance: firstly, the sound system was inadequate and secondly, there was a distinct lack of any form of refreshment on offer. Regarding the first of these two factors, lessons had clearly not been learned from the Alexandra Palace event in November of the previous year. While the band arrived onsite at Spike Island in the back of a transit van with blacked-out windows, no expense was spared for the promoter and management, who arrived by helicopter. In pulling this fast one, Evans, in a sense, fulfilled his ambition to 'get a helicopter out of the band' ! That night, The Stone Roses went back to Evans's nightclub in Manchester, and he had the audacity to try to charge them for a can of lager !
Bottom left: Britpop goes galactic. The 30,000 attendance at Spike Island (at which Noel Gallagher, Guigsy and Bonehead were present) was dwarfed by the 250,000 fans who flocked to see Oasis at Knebworth over two nights in August 1996. Reflecting on the enormity of the event ten years later, Manic Street Preachers bassist Nicky Wire recalled: "The moment for me was when John Squire came on and played 'Champagne Supernova' and just turned it into this Jimmy Pageesque, Led Zeppelin guitar solo from f*****g Mars. That moment did seem like a coming together of the great Mancunian mafia." (NME, August 2006). Upon reforming in 2011, The Stone Roses sold 220,000 tickets in 68 minutes for their three Heaton Park shows, with the first two nights selling out in 14 minutes. These were the fastest selling rock gigs in UK History.
Bottom right: The moment that marked the handover from one Manchester generation to another; John Squire performing Champagne Supernova with Oasis at Knebworth, August 1996.


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